I am Australian.

It’s Australia day!  

Already had a great breakfast up at the racecourse, where there is Aussie celebrations and a whole lot of face painting and flag waving (as well as waving away the flies).   What was great to see, was all the different cultures and faces enjoying the sunshine and music.

Australia day means different things to different people.   So no matter what part of the world you are from, today is a day to celebrate the Aussie way of life.

Happy Australia Day.

~RB~

 

It’s official: UN declares Australia 2nd best country in the world.

 

Australia has ranked 2nd in the UN’s annual Human Development Index (HDI) report.

The HDI is calculated using various factors including life expectancy, education and gross national income.
Australia’s score came in at 0.935, while Norway took out the top spot with 0.945.

We also placed ahead of Switzerland, Denmark and Netherlands.

Australia did well in all three disciplines – with a life expectancy of 82.4 years, an average schooling period of 13 years, and an average annual income of $42,261. Norway had very similar results to us, except their average income was over $20,000 higher than us.

Even still, SLAY ‘STRAYA!

 

This is Australia – Great Southern Land.

“Great Southern Land”

Standing at the limit of an endless ocean
Stranded like a runaway lost at sea
City on a rainy day down in the harbor
Watching as the gray clouds shadow the bay
Looking everywhere ’cause I had to find you
This is not the way that I remember it here
Anyone will tell you it’s a prisoner island
Hidden in the summer for a million years

Great Southern Land
Burned you black

So you look into the land, it will tell you a story
Story about a journey ended long ago
Listen to the motion of the wind in the mountains
Maybe you can hear them talking like I do
They’re gonna betray you, they’re gonna forget you
Are you gonna let them take you over that way?

Great Southern Land
Great Southern Land
You walk alone
Like a primitive man
And they make it work
With sticks and bones
See their hungry eyes
It’s a hungry home

I hear the sound
Of the strangers’ voices
I see their hungry eyes
Their hungry eyes
Great Southern Land
Great Southern Land
They burned you black
Black against the ground

Standing at the limit of an endless ocean
Stranded like a runaway lost at sea
City on a rainy day down in the harbor
Watching as the gray clouds shadow the bay
Looking everywhere, I had to find you
This is not the way that I remember it here
Anyone will tell you it’s a prisoner island
Hidden in the summer for a million years

Great Southern Land
In the sleeping sun
You walk alone
With the ghost of time
Well, they burned you black
Black against the ground
And they make it work
With rocks and sand

I hear the sound
Of the strangers’ voices
I see their hungry eyes
Their hungry eyes
Great Southern Land
Great Southern Land
You walk alone
Like a primitive man
You walk alone
With the ghost of time
And they burned you black
Yeah, they burned you black
Great Southern Land

Great Southern Land
Great Southern Land
Great Southern Land

 

 

 

 

Hugh Jackman teaches Jimmy Fallon the correct way to eat Vegemite.

 

Talk about community service.  For a long time I have watched how people from across the waters have attempted to eat Vegemite, as though it is Nutella, and spreading it on way too thick.  Yes, there is a certain way to eat vegemite and not gag.  It’s all about how you eat it.  Hot buttered toast and then a light smear.  No big knife full.  Nice to see Hugh leading the way in Vegemite eating etiquette.

Anzac Day 2015 – 100 years on.

One of the things I love about living in a small outback town, is the sense of community spirit.  Today, was one of those days where the pride of our community was on show with nearly two thirds of the whole town coming out for the dawn service for Anzac Day, 2015.  It’s been many years since the last Anzac passed away, but in the centenary of the first landing at Gallipolli, there is a sense of renewed pride and respect for those men and women that fought and died in all wars.  From Lone Pine and the actual beaches where the Australian and New Zealand forces made their ill fated landing, to the likes of my own town memorial, the outpouring of love and respect for the fallen is stronger than ever.  So many have relatives that have served our nation and its allies over the course of the last one hundred years, and there is a resounding sense of pride in the fact that in adversity, mateship shone through.

As Australians, we embrace the Anzac spirit for what it means.  We forged our identity as a nation…as a people.  Those that served will never be forgotten.

 

They went with songs to the battle, they were young.
Straight of limb, true of eye, steady and aglow.
They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted,
They fell with their faces to the foe.

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning,
We will remember them.

Lest we forget.